reflectiveteacher2014

reflectively assessing my professional goals

The creative process …tangible, tactile, and transliterate

PencilsWorking between the analog and digital realms is a fascinating topic on how one of us learn or create. Do humans create in analog metaphors? Do kids lose something when they only paint on an iPad and not with their fingers?

I’ve read several articles now that suggest humans create better in the analog sphere of creativity. (Pink, etc. ) Putting tentative ideas or visions down iniially, in pencil and paper has a unique experiential and neurological response. A topic I’d like to learn more. Danial Pink rises some of this notion in his book Whole New Mind as does Garr Reynolds, in Presentation Zen. As I have dabbled with sketching on the iPad and restarted my old hobby painting, I’ve come to reflect on the role of medium in our creative process. Why do I like to doodle notes and not type? Why does pencil to paper feel so good? Is it just a style preference or is there something deeper about our creativity and mindfulness that can process better in 3D? Perhaps this is why many of my librarian colleagues have been considering the concept of transliteracy? (Unquietlibrarian) Perhaps this is a reminder to not let the shiny tools lead the way but rather give liberty to the story.

Lucas, Scorsese: on visual literacy
http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2013/01/we-need-to-teach-visual-literacy.html

A professional or student in the 21st century needs to have a good degree of multimedia literacy. The term multimedia literacy and visual literacy encompass many things and borrow from many disciplines. However, for at least a generation or more when people speak of the need for multimedia literacy (they may call it different things) they very often focus on the high-tech tools of the day. This is especially true in education. But the tools of the day are for the most part ephemeral. But an understanding of the principles and techniques and “rules” found in the broad field of visual communication are the thing of real and lasting value. Hardware and software are important, of course, but what’s of much greater value is the software between one’s ears.

(Presentation Zen)

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“Start in analogue mode: Don’t start your presentation on the computer. Plan on paper just like a storyboard. Find some alone time to get your ideas down.”
-Garr Reynolds

In her essay in the 2003 anthology Writers Talking, Moore describes her technique of working from a daily journal and moving between notebook and computer. “I have a kind of illogical belief that certain images are magic, super-saturated with meaning. … I want to sneak up on those moments and snag them.”

  • http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/books-and-media/february-by-lisa-moore/article4292423
  • http://www.ted.com/talks/sunni_brown.html
  • http://carrotrevolution.blogspot.ca/2009/03/literacy-20.html
  • http://frankcurkovic.edublogs.org/tag/daniel-pink/
  • http://www.dailywritingtips.com/analog-vs-digital/
  • “Lo-Fi”
    http://ewic.bcs.org/upload/pdf/ewic_ev11_s15paper9.pdf
  • http://catseyewriter.com/2012/06/12/pencils-pens-and-writing-from-the-heart-the-beauty-of-low-tech-blogging/
  • http://theviewfromhere.ca/2012/07/analog-vs-digital-and-the-art-of-sketching-words/
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